HR in hospitality with Tammy Ryder


Can you tell us about your current role and career to date?

I lead the HR, learning and development, new store opening, OHS and admin functions. My days are never the same and it’s thrilling to work in such a rapidly expanding business.

Prior to my current role, I was at Australian fashion-leisure brand Lorna Jane as the executive people manager, coming from an 18-year career with Hungry Jack’s, working my way up from store team member into national roles in training, OHS and HR.

Tell us about some of the unique HR challenges in the hospitality sector.

Working with what can be a transient workforce, largely made up of casuals is a daily test. Coupled with a fast-paced environment and long hours often during nights and weekends, it can be a challenge to find individuals who are committed to the hospitality industry as a longer-term career.

The most rewarding part is to see people start with us as unskilled workers and, through our training, develop into baristas, chefs and managers.

What is the key to successful training?

Relevance and engagement without a doubt. Training should attract attention, and enable learners to change or adopt behaviours. My team and I spend time each week in our stores, speaking to team members and franchisees so we understand their roles, challenges and what they need from training.

What advice would you offer to young people entering the profession?

Be enthusiastic, passionate and willing to learn. Join a successful business with a great track record of developing their people and providing opportunities. This will give you many ways to learn, grow and develop your career.

What do you consider to be one of your greatest career achievements and why?

I’m in awe of my team at The Coffee Club. Since I joined just over a year ago, we have redefined how we support the business. They have gone from being reactive to proactive in looking at real business issues. We recently won the QSR Media Award for Training Initiative of the Year for our work in redeveloping and relaunching the learning and development program for The Coffee Club.

What do you think of AHRI’s new certification framework?

I’m a huge believer – it’s long overdue. Having a true HR professional in your business is about relevancy and up-to-date knowledge. We can equip a business with tools and resources in the people arena, which support the overall goals of a business. I will be supporting all of my team to complete the program.

This article is an edited version. The full article was first published in the November 2015 issue of HRMonthly magazine as ‘Meet … Tammy Ryder’. AHRI members receive HRMonthly 11 times per year as part of their membership. Find out more about AHRI membership here

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HR in hospitality with Tammy Ryder


Can you tell us about your current role and career to date?

I lead the HR, learning and development, new store opening, OHS and admin functions. My days are never the same and it’s thrilling to work in such a rapidly expanding business.

Prior to my current role, I was at Australian fashion-leisure brand Lorna Jane as the executive people manager, coming from an 18-year career with Hungry Jack’s, working my way up from store team member into national roles in training, OHS and HR.

Tell us about some of the unique HR challenges in the hospitality sector.

Working with what can be a transient workforce, largely made up of casuals is a daily test. Coupled with a fast-paced environment and long hours often during nights and weekends, it can be a challenge to find individuals who are committed to the hospitality industry as a longer-term career.

The most rewarding part is to see people start with us as unskilled workers and, through our training, develop into baristas, chefs and managers.

What is the key to successful training?

Relevance and engagement without a doubt. Training should attract attention, and enable learners to change or adopt behaviours. My team and I spend time each week in our stores, speaking to team members and franchisees so we understand their roles, challenges and what they need from training.

What advice would you offer to young people entering the profession?

Be enthusiastic, passionate and willing to learn. Join a successful business with a great track record of developing their people and providing opportunities. This will give you many ways to learn, grow and develop your career.

What do you consider to be one of your greatest career achievements and why?

I’m in awe of my team at The Coffee Club. Since I joined just over a year ago, we have redefined how we support the business. They have gone from being reactive to proactive in looking at real business issues. We recently won the QSR Media Award for Training Initiative of the Year for our work in redeveloping and relaunching the learning and development program for The Coffee Club.

What do you think of AHRI’s new certification framework?

I’m a huge believer – it’s long overdue. Having a true HR professional in your business is about relevancy and up-to-date knowledge. We can equip a business with tools and resources in the people arena, which support the overall goals of a business. I will be supporting all of my team to complete the program.

This article is an edited version. The full article was first published in the November 2015 issue of HRMonthly magazine as ‘Meet … Tammy Ryder’. AHRI members receive HRMonthly 11 times per year as part of their membership. Find out more about AHRI membership here

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