HRM TV: Why certification and professionalisation matters in HR


Too often, HR is seen as a ‘soft skill set’, but today’s complex workplaces demand more from HR personnel than ever before.

Catherine Cahill, a workplace relations specialist with Worksense, talks about what individuals can do to better prepare themselves for future HR challenges, as well as the drive to professionalise the industry. According to her, if HR is to continue developing as a profession, there needs to be more movement towards technical skill development, standardised practices and certification for practitioners.

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14 Comments On "HRM TV: Why certification and professionalisation matters in HR"

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Alison Scott
I am in agreement with the concerns of Andrew and Lynden. Whilst I can possibly see the potential for the introduction of the certification, it is a major financial cost that not all employers will be willing to support. Therefore for HR practitioners who have already completed tertiary qualification and possibly postgraduate level education, the cost and time burden of completing this qualification will not be attractive. For me personally I am currently in the late stages of completing an MBA and completing this qualification would only be to tick a box. Whilst the majority of CAHRI level practitioners may… Read more »
Judith Hitchcock
I would have to say I agree with Andrew. I’m a current CAHRI member with 25 years of HR experience across a variety of industries and in a variety of workplaces of different sizes. I have a couple of Cert IVs and a Diploma but no Degree (shame on me it seems – what HAVE I been doing with my time?). What I do have is intelligence and a raft of wonderful experience in different areas of HR and the ability to translate that into action. I now live and work in regional NSW with next to no exposure to… Read more »
Adrian Totolos

The requirement for soft skills are a requirement for all employees.

Kind regards,

Adrian Totolos.
Business Analyst.

Andrew

I can understand the above and AHRI’s certification program from the perspective of undergraduates without experience or experienced practitioners moving into HR, but I’m wondering what AHRI’s position is on practitioners who currently hold CAHRI status, along with a post-grad qualification in HR and have extensive experience in the field. At this stage of my career, if I had a choice between re-certifying as CAHRI and doing some other professional development, I’d be more likely to pursue the latter. I’d appreciate any advice AHRI can provide.

Trinity

I agree with you Andrew. I have an undergrad degree and am more interested in going to a post grad than certification. I think its important for the industry to seek expertise from out of the industry – for so may reasons.

Lynden
I’d have to agree with you Andrew. I’m a current CAHRI member with a double Undergraduate Degree in Law, a Post-Graduate Diploma and a Masters in HR and extensive experience in both small and large corporations working specifically at an HR management and business partnering level. I absolutely agree that HR is a profession that is more than simply soft-skills based and requires application at an academic level. I have to say though that after 12 years of high quality, rigorous tertiary study, to say I still need to complete a ‘capstone unit’ at a cost of $1500 to prove… Read more »
Jon

Existing CAHRI members will retain their membership grading via a grandfathering arrangement. However, from 1 January 2017 members wanting to become certified will only be able to do so through completing the AHRI Practising Certification Program (APC).

Recognition of prior learning (RPL) and work experience can apply and, if it does, you will only need to complete the final 4th Capstone unit to become certified.

ange
I think this is a great idea for new AHRI members or those wishing to upgrade their membership. I do however concur with Andrew and Lynden (and others). I accept the ‘grand fathering’ clause has given some consideration to existing CAHRI members, however I too agree it hasn’t gone far enough. I have been a CAHRI member (and in the industry) for a long time and believe the RPL framework (with cost and tasks attached) doesn’t go far enough. I won’t be taking up the offer – because unlike Lynden I do have a choice. I see no value in… Read more »
Brad Armstrong

Completely agree with this, absolutely spot on.

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HRM TV: Why certification and professionalisation matters in HR


Too often, HR is seen as a ‘soft skill set’, but today’s complex workplaces demand more from HR personnel than ever before.

Catherine Cahill, a workplace relations specialist with Worksense, talks about what individuals can do to better prepare themselves for future HR challenges, as well as the drive to professionalise the industry. According to her, if HR is to continue developing as a profession, there needs to be more movement towards technical skill development, standardised practices and certification for practitioners.

Leave a reply

14 Comments On "HRM TV: Why certification and professionalisation matters in HR"

avatar
  Subscribe to receive comments  
Notify me of
Alison Scott
I am in agreement with the concerns of Andrew and Lynden. Whilst I can possibly see the potential for the introduction of the certification, it is a major financial cost that not all employers will be willing to support. Therefore for HR practitioners who have already completed tertiary qualification and possibly postgraduate level education, the cost and time burden of completing this qualification will not be attractive. For me personally I am currently in the late stages of completing an MBA and completing this qualification would only be to tick a box. Whilst the majority of CAHRI level practitioners may… Read more »
Judith Hitchcock
I would have to say I agree with Andrew. I’m a current CAHRI member with 25 years of HR experience across a variety of industries and in a variety of workplaces of different sizes. I have a couple of Cert IVs and a Diploma but no Degree (shame on me it seems – what HAVE I been doing with my time?). What I do have is intelligence and a raft of wonderful experience in different areas of HR and the ability to translate that into action. I now live and work in regional NSW with next to no exposure to… Read more »
Adrian Totolos

The requirement for soft skills are a requirement for all employees.

Kind regards,

Adrian Totolos.
Business Analyst.

Andrew

I can understand the above and AHRI’s certification program from the perspective of undergraduates without experience or experienced practitioners moving into HR, but I’m wondering what AHRI’s position is on practitioners who currently hold CAHRI status, along with a post-grad qualification in HR and have extensive experience in the field. At this stage of my career, if I had a choice between re-certifying as CAHRI and doing some other professional development, I’d be more likely to pursue the latter. I’d appreciate any advice AHRI can provide.

Trinity

I agree with you Andrew. I have an undergrad degree and am more interested in going to a post grad than certification. I think its important for the industry to seek expertise from out of the industry – for so may reasons.

Lynden
I’d have to agree with you Andrew. I’m a current CAHRI member with a double Undergraduate Degree in Law, a Post-Graduate Diploma and a Masters in HR and extensive experience in both small and large corporations working specifically at an HR management and business partnering level. I absolutely agree that HR is a profession that is more than simply soft-skills based and requires application at an academic level. I have to say though that after 12 years of high quality, rigorous tertiary study, to say I still need to complete a ‘capstone unit’ at a cost of $1500 to prove… Read more »
Jon

Existing CAHRI members will retain their membership grading via a grandfathering arrangement. However, from 1 January 2017 members wanting to become certified will only be able to do so through completing the AHRI Practising Certification Program (APC).

Recognition of prior learning (RPL) and work experience can apply and, if it does, you will only need to complete the final 4th Capstone unit to become certified.

ange
I think this is a great idea for new AHRI members or those wishing to upgrade their membership. I do however concur with Andrew and Lynden (and others). I accept the ‘grand fathering’ clause has given some consideration to existing CAHRI members, however I too agree it hasn’t gone far enough. I have been a CAHRI member (and in the industry) for a long time and believe the RPL framework (with cost and tasks attached) doesn’t go far enough. I won’t be taking up the offer – because unlike Lynden I do have a choice. I see no value in… Read more »
Brad Armstrong

Completely agree with this, absolutely spot on.

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