How to write a job description that will get noticed


Stuck on writing an attention-grabbing job description? An expert walks you through some new trends that will give them more snap.

Who wants to be a customer service operator when you can be a custom happiness manager? And being a domestic technician sounds much fancier than being a housewife, as does being a sanitation consultant rather than a toilet cleaner.

Job descriptions are undergoing an overhaul at the moment, shifting from traditional and predictable to quirky and fun, says business coach Terri Billington.

Apart from simply having a swish new job description, a revamped job title can inspire current staff to perform better in their role, as new descriptions can offer more accurate detail and clarity, she says.

A great job description can also help attract the right people to a role, as well as better engage employees currently in that position. Recruits might also be interested in taking on a unique job title that sets them apart from others in the industry.

However, when it comes to creating a new job description, it’s important to use the right words to attract the ideal recruits to the role.

“I could be an administrative receptionist and looking to be an office manager, but if you don’t know what to search for when looking for a new position, it’s more challenging to advance,” explains Billington. “It needs to be clear to the market what the new job description entails.”

For example, the role might be Officer of Customer Delight, but make sure you use words like ‘happy’, ‘friendly’ and ‘service-oriented’ in the description. You might even want to put the word ‘receptionist’ in brackets after the new job title so people know exactly what you mean.

It’s also important to rein in your creativity and imagination when dreaming up a new job description, warns Billington.

“There are some crazy ones out there at the moment. Some people try to make their own titles sound better than what their jobs actually are, instead of just being proud of being in their position – whether that’s washing the dishes or being a paperboy,” she says. “It’s a cover up for some people who hope no-one really asks them what they do.”

Before you decide to completely change people’s job descriptions, consult with them and get their buy-in, advises Billington. She suggests brainstorming new job titles as a team, rather than simply handing them out to staff.

“You’re asking for trouble if you haven’t consulted with employees,” Billington warns. “Some people do not want change; they’re quite happy with their positions, and if you give someone a new title without consulting them, it’s going to cause conflict.”

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How to make job ads more attractive to passive candidates – Davidson
4 years ago

[…] active candidates aren’t as discriminating, you are able to offer traditional job descriptions. However, a more discerning candidate will want to see how the new job defines the challenges, key […]

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How to write a job description that will get noticed


Stuck on writing an attention-grabbing job description? An expert walks you through some new trends that will give them more snap.

Who wants to be a customer service operator when you can be a custom happiness manager? And being a domestic technician sounds much fancier than being a housewife, as does being a sanitation consultant rather than a toilet cleaner.

Job descriptions are undergoing an overhaul at the moment, shifting from traditional and predictable to quirky and fun, says business coach Terri Billington.

Apart from simply having a swish new job description, a revamped job title can inspire current staff to perform better in their role, as new descriptions can offer more accurate detail and clarity, she says.

A great job description can also help attract the right people to a role, as well as better engage employees currently in that position. Recruits might also be interested in taking on a unique job title that sets them apart from others in the industry.

However, when it comes to creating a new job description, it’s important to use the right words to attract the ideal recruits to the role.

“I could be an administrative receptionist and looking to be an office manager, but if you don’t know what to search for when looking for a new position, it’s more challenging to advance,” explains Billington. “It needs to be clear to the market what the new job description entails.”

For example, the role might be Officer of Customer Delight, but make sure you use words like ‘happy’, ‘friendly’ and ‘service-oriented’ in the description. You might even want to put the word ‘receptionist’ in brackets after the new job title so people know exactly what you mean.

It’s also important to rein in your creativity and imagination when dreaming up a new job description, warns Billington.

“There are some crazy ones out there at the moment. Some people try to make their own titles sound better than what their jobs actually are, instead of just being proud of being in their position – whether that’s washing the dishes or being a paperboy,” she says. “It’s a cover up for some people who hope no-one really asks them what they do.”

Before you decide to completely change people’s job descriptions, consult with them and get their buy-in, advises Billington. She suggests brainstorming new job titles as a team, rather than simply handing them out to staff.

“You’re asking for trouble if you haven’t consulted with employees,” Billington warns. “Some people do not want change; they’re quite happy with their positions, and if you give someone a new title without consulting them, it’s going to cause conflict.”

guest
1 Comment
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
trackback
How to make job ads more attractive to passive candidates – Davidson
4 years ago

[…] active candidates aren’t as discriminating, you are able to offer traditional job descriptions. However, a more discerning candidate will want to see how the new job defines the challenges, key […]

More on HRM