Employees crave skills development. Why don’t more get it?


Recent research reveals there’s a gap between the skills development employees want and what they get. What’s going on?

A recent report by Hudson found only 2 per cent of employees don’t rate career development as a key priority. Interestingly, the same report found 98 per cent of employees take personal responsibility for their own skills development.

So what gives? Are employers leaving employees to drive their own learning and development?

With 76 per cent of employees having their eyes on the door, now more than ever employers need to provide a reason to stay.

With Australia in transition from commodities to a knowledge-based economy, providing visible and valued L&D is a key engagement and retention tool.

Why then, according to Hudson, do 50 per cent of employees feel unsupported by their manager to improve their existing skills? Of the development that is occurring, 43 per cent of employees consider the time they spend on development each month as inadequate.

Drawing a picture it is unmistakable that in 2016 employees, are yearning to be developed. This presents a perfect opportunity for HR and the leadership team to step-up and implement skills development programs.

So what type of development are employees seeking?

Long gone are the days when traditional, classroom-based development is considered the only approach. In fact, an AHRI 2013 white paper report of 561 employers found only 10 per cent reported funding formal education for their employees.

This makes sense.

Research out of the UK by City & Guilds Group found 68 per cent of employee’s preferred on-the-job learning and development opportunities such as stretch assignments, cross division projects and coaching for skills development.

These activities provide opportunities for employees to capitalise on their skill sets and build their future value in the market. For employers, improving current skills drives the competitiveness of the business.

So what skills do employees want and do employers need?

Hudson reported both managers and employees listing “driving and managing change” as one of the top two skills required in the workplace today.

Take an innovative approach and ask your employees what skills they believe they need to do their jobs effectively and match it to what the employers needs are.

Once you have visibility, you can assess the areas of synergy and formulate a learning and development strategy that will drive engagement and retention while delivering on business strategy.

Where is your organisation in building a win-win learning and development framework?

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Employees crave skills development. Why don’t more get it?


Recent research reveals there’s a gap between the skills development employees want and what they get. What’s going on?

A recent report by Hudson found only 2 per cent of employees don’t rate career development as a key priority. Interestingly, the same report found 98 per cent of employees take personal responsibility for their own skills development.

So what gives? Are employers leaving employees to drive their own learning and development?

With 76 per cent of employees having their eyes on the door, now more than ever employers need to provide a reason to stay.

With Australia in transition from commodities to a knowledge-based economy, providing visible and valued L&D is a key engagement and retention tool.

Why then, according to Hudson, do 50 per cent of employees feel unsupported by their manager to improve their existing skills? Of the development that is occurring, 43 per cent of employees consider the time they spend on development each month as inadequate.

Drawing a picture it is unmistakable that in 2016 employees, are yearning to be developed. This presents a perfect opportunity for HR and the leadership team to step-up and implement skills development programs.

So what type of development are employees seeking?

Long gone are the days when traditional, classroom-based development is considered the only approach. In fact, an AHRI 2013 white paper report of 561 employers found only 10 per cent reported funding formal education for their employees.

This makes sense.

Research out of the UK by City & Guilds Group found 68 per cent of employee’s preferred on-the-job learning and development opportunities such as stretch assignments, cross division projects and coaching for skills development.

These activities provide opportunities for employees to capitalise on their skill sets and build their future value in the market. For employers, improving current skills drives the competitiveness of the business.

So what skills do employees want and do employers need?

Hudson reported both managers and employees listing “driving and managing change” as one of the top two skills required in the workplace today.

Take an innovative approach and ask your employees what skills they believe they need to do their jobs effectively and match it to what the employers needs are.

Once you have visibility, you can assess the areas of synergy and formulate a learning and development strategy that will drive engagement and retention while delivering on business strategy.

Where is your organisation in building a win-win learning and development framework?

Leave a reply

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500
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Notify me of
More on HRM