2 reasons why there aren’t more women in tech


There are many reasons why women are underrepresented in the world’s tech workforce. But here are two that HR can do something about.

Last year Google had a diversity scandal. A man felt the tech giant’s diversity policies were sexist, and that they privileged women in a way that harmed men. Which is another way of saying that the tech sector’s gender imbalance isn’t just skin deep.

Indeed culture is one of the barriers preventing women from considering a career inside a technology-focused company, says Christy Forest, non-executive director at LiveHire. Episodes like the Google memo act as a kind of red flag to potential female candidates, telling them that they might be entering an industry that doesn’t welcome them.

Ready for the job

Looking to the future, the expectation is that most roles will have at least some tech component. So it’s imperative that women feel enabled to chase after positions with such a requirement today. Key to that is having organisations become sensitive to the cultural differences between potential job candidates.

For instance, research shows that – compared with women – men are more willing to go for roles where they don’t fulfil some of the criteria. The reasons for this are complex, but from an HR perspective the solution is fairly simple.

Watch the video to find out more.

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2 Comments On "2 reasons why there aren’t more women in tech"

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Tina

Gender diversity is definitely a hot topic for 2018. Luckily, women are starting to have some really incredible role models in male dominated industries like IT. Australia has a number of inspirational women entrepreneurs who have founded, co-founded and who run tech companies like Annie Parker, co-founder of muru-D, Elaine Stead of Blue Sky Funds and Cyan Ta’eed co-founder of Envato. Hopefully, with more and more women like these 3 examples, younger women may feel some hope that there is a place for them in the tech world and that true gender diversity is possible.

Doug

Maybe some organisation should develop a quota system!

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2 reasons why there aren’t more women in tech


There are many reasons why women are underrepresented in the world’s tech workforce. But here are two that HR can do something about.

Last year Google had a diversity scandal. A man felt the tech giant’s diversity policies were sexist, and that they privileged women in a way that harmed men. Which is another way of saying that the tech sector’s gender imbalance isn’t just skin deep.

Indeed culture is one of the barriers preventing women from considering a career inside a technology-focused company, says Christy Forest, non-executive director at LiveHire. Episodes like the Google memo act as a kind of red flag to potential female candidates, telling them that they might be entering an industry that doesn’t welcome them.

Ready for the job

Looking to the future, the expectation is that most roles will have at least some tech component. So it’s imperative that women feel enabled to chase after positions with such a requirement today. Key to that is having organisations become sensitive to the cultural differences between potential job candidates.

For instance, research shows that – compared with women – men are more willing to go for roles where they don’t fulfil some of the criteria. The reasons for this are complex, but from an HR perspective the solution is fairly simple.

Watch the video to find out more.

Leave a reply

2 Comments On "2 reasons why there aren’t more women in tech"

avatar
  Subscribe to receive comments  
Notify me of
Tina

Gender diversity is definitely a hot topic for 2018. Luckily, women are starting to have some really incredible role models in male dominated industries like IT. Australia has a number of inspirational women entrepreneurs who have founded, co-founded and who run tech companies like Annie Parker, co-founder of muru-D, Elaine Stead of Blue Sky Funds and Cyan Ta’eed co-founder of Envato. Hopefully, with more and more women like these 3 examples, younger women may feel some hope that there is a place for them in the tech world and that true gender diversity is possible.

Doug

Maybe some organisation should develop a quota system!

Jobs board
More on HRM